Difference between revisions of "Is control a type of negative feedback?"

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Negative feedback refers to a type of control technique where the control action is in the opposite direction from the error.  For example, in the cruise control system when the vehicle is too slow, the response of a negative feedback law would be to speed up.  This is opposed to positive feedback, where the control action is in the same direction as the error.  Positive feedback systems exhibit unstable behavior; the most common example is the high-pitched humming in a sound system when a microphone is placed directly in front of a speaker.
 
Negative feedback refers to a type of control technique where the control action is in the opposite direction from the error.  For example, in the cruise control system when the vehicle is too slow, the response of a negative feedback law would be to speed up.  This is opposed to positive feedback, where the control action is in the same direction as the error.  Positive feedback systems exhibit unstable behavior; the most common example is the high-pitched humming in a sound system when a microphone is placed directly in front of a speaker.
  
--[[User:Braman|George Hines, posted by Julia Braman]] 20:46, 1 October 2007 (PDT)
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--[[User:Hines|George Hines]] 20:46, 1 October 2007 (PDT)
  
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture w-m]]
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[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 1-1]]
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture w-m, Fall 2007]]
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[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 1-1, Fall 2007]]

Latest revision as of 18:30, 2 October 2007

Control is not a type of negative feedback. "Control" is a set of techniques that allow us to manipulate engineered systems automatically, and some of these techniques use negative feedback.

Negative feedback refers to a type of control technique where the control action is in the opposite direction from the error. For example, in the cruise control system when the vehicle is too slow, the response of a negative feedback law would be to speed up. This is opposed to positive feedback, where the control action is in the same direction as the error. Positive feedback systems exhibit unstable behavior; the most common example is the high-pitched humming in a sound system when a microphone is placed directly in front of a speaker.

--George Hines 20:46, 1 October 2007 (PDT)