Difference between revisions of "Hiroki Miyazako, Feb 2016"

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(Created page with "* Visitor: Hiroki Miyazako (U. Tokyo) * Date: February 22nd (Mon) === Schedule === * Feb 22 (Mon) === Seminar ===")
 
 
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* Visitor: Hiroki Miyazako (U. Tokyo)
 
* Visitor: Hiroki Miyazako (U. Tokyo)
* Date: February 22nd (Mon)
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* Date: February 22nd (Mon), 23rd (Tue)
  
 
=== Schedule ===
 
=== Schedule ===
* Feb 22 (Mon)
+
==== Feb 22 (Mon) ====
 +
* 9:30 - Yutaka - ANB 218
 +
* 11:00 -
 +
* 11:45 - Lunch
 +
* 13:00 -
 +
* 13:45 - seminar set up
 +
* 14:00 - seminar - Steele 110
 +
* 15:15 -
 +
* 16:00 -
 +
* 16:45 -
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* 17:30 - Done
  
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=== Seminar ===
 +
'''Title:''' In-situ control of chemical reactions and transportation in nanofluidics using an inverted electron-beam lithography system
  
 +
'''Abstract:''' Manipulation techniques of chemical reactions and transportation, such as microfluidic devices and optical manipulation, have been widely studied for biochemical analysis.  However, these techniques have still limitations on degrees-of-freedoms and spatiotemporal resolution.  In this talk, we present a new method for control of chemical reactions and transportation in liquid samples using an electron beam (EB).  By irradiating low-energy EBs to liquid samples through a 100-nm-thick silicon nitride membrane, electrical and chemical effects of the EBs can be applied to the samples with a resolution of 120 nm.  We show our EB system can achieve several in-situ manipulations such as fluid control, fabrication of cell scaffolds and manipulation of cell membrane.  Moreover, we describe some applications of our EB technique to single cell analysis and manipulation of biomolecules.
  
=== Seminar ===
+
'''Bio:''' Hiroki Miyazako received the B.E degree in engineering and the M.S. degree in information science and technology from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 2013 and 2015, respectively.  He is currently a Doctoral Student at the University of Tokyo. He is working as a JSPS Research Fellow (DC1).  He is focusing on directed self-assembly of molecular and cell systems using nanotechnology.  He was the recipient of the Conference Award at the 13th SICE Conference on Control Systems in 2014, and JSME Fellow Award for Outstanding Young Engineers in 2015.

Latest revision as of 17:03, 21 February 2016

  • Visitor: Hiroki Miyazako (U. Tokyo)
  • Date: February 22nd (Mon), 23rd (Tue)

Schedule

Feb 22 (Mon)

  • 9:30 - Yutaka - ANB 218
  • 11:00 -
  • 11:45 - Lunch
  • 13:00 -
  • 13:45 - seminar set up
  • 14:00 - seminar - Steele 110
  • 15:15 -
  • 16:00 -
  • 16:45 -
  • 17:30 - Done

Seminar

Title: In-situ control of chemical reactions and transportation in nanofluidics using an inverted electron-beam lithography system

Abstract: Manipulation techniques of chemical reactions and transportation, such as microfluidic devices and optical manipulation, have been widely studied for biochemical analysis. However, these techniques have still limitations on degrees-of-freedoms and spatiotemporal resolution. In this talk, we present a new method for control of chemical reactions and transportation in liquid samples using an electron beam (EB). By irradiating low-energy EBs to liquid samples through a 100-nm-thick silicon nitride membrane, electrical and chemical effects of the EBs can be applied to the samples with a resolution of 120 nm. We show our EB system can achieve several in-situ manipulations such as fluid control, fabrication of cell scaffolds and manipulation of cell membrane. Moreover, we describe some applications of our EB technique to single cell analysis and manipulation of biomolecules.

Bio: Hiroki Miyazako received the B.E degree in engineering and the M.S. degree in information science and technology from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 2013 and 2015, respectively. He is currently a Doctoral Student at the University of Tokyo. He is working as a JSPS Research Fellow (DC1). He is focusing on directed self-assembly of molecular and cell systems using nanotechnology. He was the recipient of the Conference Award at the 13th SICE Conference on Control Systems in 2014, and JSME Fellow Award for Outstanding Young Engineers in 2015.