Difference between revisions of "Does pole zero cancellation happen and is it useful?"

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It is generally a bad idea to cancel unstable poles or zeros because for this to work it would need to be exact; for real systems, we almost never know exactly where a pole or zero is because our model can never be good enough.  However, for robust performance considerations, it is sometimes useful to cancel a stable pole or zero.  Chapter 12 of Astrom and Murray talks more about this.
 
It is generally a bad idea to cancel unstable poles or zeros because for this to work it would need to be exact; for real systems, we almost never know exactly where a pole or zero is because our model can never be good enough.  However, for robust performance considerations, it is sometimes useful to cancel a stable pole or zero.  Chapter 12 of Astrom and Murray talks more about this.
  
--[[User:Braman|Braman]] 19:03, 3 November 2008 (PST)
+
--[[User:Braman|Julia Braman]] 19:03, 3 November 2008 (PST)
  
 
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 6-1]]
 
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 6-1]]
 
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 6-1, Fall 2008]]
 
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 6-1, Fall 2008]]

Latest revision as of 03:03, 4 November 2008

It is generally a bad idea to cancel unstable poles or zeros because for this to work it would need to be exact; for real systems, we almost never know exactly where a pole or zero is because our model can never be good enough. However, for robust performance considerations, it is sometimes useful to cancel a stable pole or zero. Chapter 12 of Astrom and Murray talks more about this.

--Julia Braman 19:03, 3 November 2008 (PST)