Difference between revisions of "Could you give a precise definition for "Control Law"?"

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A control law, which is usually part of the controller, takes the output of a process one wants to control as input. This input is then used in an algorithm to compute an output u, which is sent to the actuating mechanism to perform a corrective action. For example, in a cruise control system, the control law compares the reference speed to the current speed and uses this error (vr - v) in a PID control algorithm to determine the signal u that is then sent to the actuators to decrease the error between the desired and actual speed.
 
A control law, which is usually part of the controller, takes the output of a process one wants to control as input. This input is then used in an algorithm to compute an output u, which is sent to the actuating mechanism to perform a corrective action. For example, in a cruise control system, the control law compares the reference speed to the current speed and uses this error (vr - v) in a PID control algorithm to determine the signal u that is then sent to the actuators to decrease the error between the desired and actual speed.
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--[[User:Soto|Luis Soto]] 15:49, 10 October 2007 (PDT)
 
--[[User:Soto|Luis Soto]] 15:49, 10 October 2007 (PDT)
 
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 2-2]]
 
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 2-2]]
 
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 2-2, Fall 2007]]
 
[[Category: CDS 101/110 FAQ - Lecture 2-2, Fall 2007]]

Revision as of 23:53, 10 October 2007

A control law, which is usually part of the controller, takes the output of a process one wants to control as input. This input is then used in an algorithm to compute an output u, which is sent to the actuating mechanism to perform a corrective action. For example, in a cruise control system, the control law compares the reference speed to the current speed and uses this error (vr - v) in a PID control algorithm to determine the signal u that is then sent to the actuators to decrease the error between the desired and actual speed.

--Luis Soto 15:49, 10 October 2007 (PDT)